Matthew Cox

Multicam Afghanistan

U.S. Army officials released an official statement today on its long-waited camouflage decision, and it left a lot of questions unanswered.

The statement echoes what Gen. Dennis L. Via, the head of Army Materiel Command, said July 23 – that Scorpion W2 would likely be fielded sometime in 2015.

But the statement never names Scorpion W2 as the replacement for the current Universal Camouflage Pattern. It only refers to the pattern as the Army’s new Operational Camouflage Pattern.

Here’s the complete statement:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Army statement on the Operational Camouflage Uniform

July 31, 2014

By Senior Army Spokesperson

ARLINGTON, Va. (July 31, 2014) — The Army has selected a pattern as its
base combat uniform camouflage pattern. The Army has confirmed through
testing that the pattern would offer exceptional concealment, which directly
enhances force protection and survivability for Soldiers.

The Army is naming the pattern the Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP) to
emphasize that the pattern’s use extends beyond Afghanistan to all Combatant
Commands. The Army’s adoption of OCP will be fiscally responsible by
transitioning over time and simply replacing current uniforms and equipment
as they wear out.

The Army anticipates the Army Combat Uniform with the OCP will be available
for purchase by Soldiers at Military Clothing Sales Stores (MCSS) in the
summer of 2015.\\_______

There are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. At the top of the list is a detailed account of the testing the Army put this revised version of the original 2002 Scorpion pattern through.

Roughly a year ago, Army uniform officials completed a four-year camouflage improvement effort. The finalists were Crye Precision, ADS Inc., teamed with Hyperstealth, Inc.; Brookwood Companies Inc.; and Kryptek Inc.

The Army should explain how Scorpion W2 compares to these top-performing patterns and release the test data to the public.

 

 

 

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sog_tf102_0006_closed-frontSOG Specialty Knives and Tools, has a new addition to the Trident folder series.

The Trident Elite features a 3.7-inch, straight-edge AUS-8 stainless steel blade. SOG’s patented Assisted Technology that opens the blade with authority once you start the opening action and dual thumb studs on the blade to allow for easy ambidextrous opening, SOG officials maintain.

It has  a glass-reinforced nylon handle with textured rubber inserts.

At the front of the handle lives a built-in carbide glass breaker. The handle also features a built-in groove for safely cutting through thin rope, belts or webbing without having to open the blade.

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3235Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. just unveiled its new LC9s pistol, a striker-fired version of its compact, LC9 9mm pistol.

Like the LC9, the LC9s is a slim, lightweight, personal protection pistol, but it features a newly designed trigger mechanism with a short, light, crisp trigger pull that improves accuracy and performance, Ruger officials say.

“The Ruger LC9 set a high standard for reliable, lightweight personal protection,” said Chris Killoy, Ruger president and CEO of Ruger. “The LC9s™ follows the success of the LC9, yet provides a new option for shooters who prefer the short, crisp trigger pull of a striker-fired pistol,” he added.

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The U.S. Army may is trying to replace the M9 9mm pistol, but it’s still buying new Berettas.

Beretta Defense Technologies announced today that the Army will spend “a quarter million dollars worth of additional M9 pistols from Beretta U.S.A. Corp, according to a press release from the Beretta.

The Army acquired the additional pistols by issuing the 6th delivery order to date against a contract for up to 100,000 pistols awarded by the Army to Beretta U.S.A. Corp. in September 2012, the press release states.

The Pentagon adopted the M9 in 1985. It has been in U.S. production since 1987 and is manufactured at the Beretta U.S.A. facility located in Accokeek, Maryland. To date, Beretta has delivered over 600,000 M9 pistols, with 18,000 already scheduled for delivery under the new 5-year contract.

As the lead agent for small arms, the Army will hold an industry day July 29 to talk to gun makers about the joint, Modular Handgun System or MHS. [click to continue…]

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Raven Concealment  Systems is marketing what looks like a handy little piece of kit for concealing bulky EDC items in your front pants pocket.

The ModuLoader Pocket Shield is a flexible platform which allows an individual to securely and discreetly carry a small defensive implement — such as a firearm, pistol magazine, fixed-blade or folding knife, flashlight, canister of pepper spray or an expandable baton —  inside the front pocket of jeans or dress pants without visible pocket clips or printing, Raven officials maintain.

“The Pocket Shield not only provides a stable platform – it masks the profile of whatever is attached to it. This is especially important for those who must wear dress pants or other garments made with thin, clingy material,” according to Raven officials.

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SilencerCo today unveiled its new suppressor designed for shotguns. The Salvo 12 provides a much needed option for shooting enthusiasts, officials from the Utah-based suppressor manufacture maintain.

“The Salvo 12 represents a revolution in silencers, not just an evolution,” said Joshua Waldron, Chief Executive Officer for SilencerCo, in a July 21 press release. “There is a huge installed base of shotgun hunters and shooters that has been waiting for a product like this for a long time, and we are proud to deliver it.”

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The U.S. Army has been very hush-hush about its decision to replace its Universal Camouflage Pattern with Scorpion, a pattern the service has owned since 2002. But details are slipping out. My story on Military.com today talks about how the improved version — Scorpion W2– looks virtually the same as MultiCam.

Caleb Crye, the owner of Crye Precision, developed the original Scorpion pattern for the Army’s Future Force warrior program. Then he made some changes to help it perform better and trademarked it as MultiCam.

It will be interesting to see whether Crye thinks the new Scorpion W2 looks too similar to MultiCam. It would nice if the Army didn’t have to phase out the $3 billion worth of MultiCam uniforms and equipment it has purchased so far for Afghanistan.

Wouldn’t that be a waste of taxpayer money? But I’m sure Army uniform officials are too smart to let that happen.

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