Matthew Cox

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Houlding Precision Firearms has come out with a 6.2-pound, custom AR15 known as the HPF-WRAITH.

The WRAITH features the newest member of the HPF family of handguards, the HPF-NMX Handguard. It’s made out of ultra-light carbon fiber, not wrapped or painted, and finished with billet end caps, HPF officials maintain.

The NMX has the latest Magpul M-Lok accessory rail system slots in all positions for maximum versatility. The ergonomic octagonal shape of the NMX ensures a sure grip and includes the very light, aluminum HPF-Barrel Nut.

Despite its lightweight feel, the quality and durability have not been compromised, HPF officials maintain.

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size0 (3)                                                                                            Photo courtesy of U.S. Army/Sgt. 1st Class Adam Stone

U.S. Army paratroopers recently got some foreign weapons training as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve.

The Polish Land Forces 6th Airborne Battalion, 6th Airborne Brigade trained members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade on Polish weapons at Drawsko Pomorskie training area.

The American paratroopers assembled, loaded and fired the Polish RPG-7B, a reusable rocket- propelled grenade launcher. They also got hand-on training with the M1996 Beryl 5.56mm rifle, the UKM-2000 machine gun, and the Polish M-83 9mm pistol.

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Crye Precision LLC has unveiled a new line of modular pouches that offers a few new twists on the general purpose pouch genre.

The Smart Pouch Suite features six pouches and accessories to offer multiple options for carrying kit to satisfy mission needs, Crye officials maintain.

The SPS consists of a Frag Pouch, 5.56/7.62/MBITR Pouch, 152/Bottle Pouch, GP Pouch 6x6x3, GP Pouch 9x7x3 and GP Pouch 11x6x4.

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male front

The U.S. Army promises its new physical fitness uniform will outfit soldiers with a design that’s comparable to the latest commercially, work-out attire.

The service released the details of the new Army Physical Fitness Uniform Aug. 11, and I wrote about it on Military.com.

The Army also stressed that the new design will address shortcomings with the current work-out trunks, according to Robert Mortlock, program manager, Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment.

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IWI US, Inc., a subsidiary of Israel Weapon Industries (IWI) Ltd., today introduced the IWI US Online Web Store (www.iwi.us/Products), for fans of the Tavor SAR.

The new store offers a host of Tavor accessories, including the IWI Vertical Foregrip and Ergonomic Foregrip, the Foregrip Light Holder and Flashlight/Laser Holder, the Tavor SAR Forearm Picatinny Rail and cleaning kits.

“We are thrilled to have launched the IWI US Online Web Store,” Michael Kassnar, VP of Sales and Marketing for IWI US, said in a recent press release. “This has been a long time coming and we’ve worked really hard to create something our fans would appreciate and find simple to navigate.”

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Op Cam Patt frontal

At long last, the U.S. Army has released the first images of its new Operational Camouflage Pattern, the replacement for the service’s Universal Camouflage Pattern. Army Times was the first to post the new pics yesterday.

The service plans to print Army Combat Uniforms in the new pattern and make them available at at Military Clothing Sales Stores next summer.

OCP is also known as Scorpion W2, a revised version of the original Scorpion pattern that Crye Precision LLC developed for the Army’s Future Force Warrior in 2002. Crye later made small adjustments to the pattern for better performance and trademark purposes and called it MultiCam.

The new OCP is very similar to MultiCam, the pattern the Army chose in 2010 for soldiers to wear in Afghanistan. Army officials maintain however that there are differences between the two patterns.

Stay tuned for future updates.

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Multicam Afghanistan

U.S. Army officials released an official statement today on its long-waited camouflage decision, and it left a lot of questions unanswered.

The statement echoes what Gen. Dennis L. Via, the head of Army Materiel Command, said July 23 – that Scorpion W2 would likely be fielded sometime in 2015.

But the statement never names Scorpion W2 as the replacement for the current Universal Camouflage Pattern. It only refers to the pattern as the Army’s new Operational Camouflage Pattern.

Here’s the complete statement:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Army statement on the Operational Camouflage Uniform

July 31, 2014

By Senior Army Spokesperson

ARLINGTON, Va. (July 31, 2014) — The Army has selected a pattern as its
base combat uniform camouflage pattern. The Army has confirmed through
testing that the pattern would offer exceptional concealment, which directly
enhances force protection and survivability for Soldiers.

The Army is naming the pattern the Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP) to
emphasize that the pattern’s use extends beyond Afghanistan to all Combatant
Commands. The Army’s adoption of OCP will be fiscally responsible by
transitioning over time and simply replacing current uniforms and equipment
as they wear out.

The Army anticipates the Army Combat Uniform with the OCP will be available
for purchase by Soldiers at Military Clothing Sales Stores (MCSS) in the
summer of 2015.\\_______

There are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. At the top of the list is a detailed account of the testing the Army put this revised version of the original 2002 Scorpion pattern through.

Roughly a year ago, Army uniform officials completed a four-year camouflage improvement effort. The finalists were Crye Precision, ADS Inc., teamed with Hyperstealth, Inc.; Brookwood Companies Inc.; and Kryptek Inc.

The Army should explain how Scorpion W2 compares to these top-performing patterns and release the test data to the public.

 

 

 

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