Grunts

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Daniel Defense just released an upgrade to its popular Aimpoint Micro Mount.

The Aimpoint Micro Mount (Absolute Co-witness) users the option of both an absolute or lower 1/3rd co-witness with iron sights and Aimpoint’s popular Micro R-1, H-1, T-1, or T-2 optics.

“In the early years, we earned the reputation of being a rails & accessories company,” said Marty Daniel, the president and CEO for Daniel Defense. “It remains a core element of our business, and this upgrade to the Aimpoint mount demonstrates our ability to take a proven product and elevate it to the next level.”

The improved mount features our Patented Rock & Lock attachment system and secures to any MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny Rail with two slotted machine screws.

These fasteners thread into stainless steel self-locking threaded inserts that resist vibration and loosening. Offering absolute or a lower 1/3rd co-witness with your back-up iron sights, this mount is ideal for shooters who are looking for the lightest mount to accent their Aimpoint Micro, Daniel Defense officials officials maintain.

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The swatch of Army uniform fabric on the right has been treated with a special coating, making it super liquid repellent. Three drops of grape juice sit on top. The un-coated swatch on the left could not keep the grape juice from soaking in. (U.S. Army photo) The swatch of Army uniform fabric on the right has been treated with a special coating, making it super liquid repellent. Three drops of grape juice sit on top. The un-coated swatch on the left could not keep the grape juice from soaking in. (U.S. Army photo)

U.S. Army scientists have developed an advanced coating for fabrics that could make soldier uniforms much more effective at repelling water, oil and many other liquid chemicals.

This durable “omniphobic” coating is much more repellent than Quarpel – a water-repellent coating that has been used for the past 40 years, Army officials maintain.

“It’s omniphobic. That means it hates everything,” Quoc Truong, a physical scientist at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, said in an Army press release.

Truong and other Army scientist developed the coating to ensure “minimal impact to Army fabrics’ original physical properties and performances, such as comfort, while providing added repellency to water, oil and toxic chemicals,” the release states.

The coating greatly reduces how often soldiers need to clean their clothes and enhances chem-bio protection, according to Army officials.

Uniforms treated with the coating then underwent field testing to assess field durability, performance and user acceptance.

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IWI US, Inc. just announced the release of its expensive new IWI Tavor Tactical Combat Folding Knife.

This exclusive design is produced from the “finest CPM-154 steel and is set into a textured G-10 handle that aids in grip retention. It has all black stainless steel hardware with a black anodized aluminum back spacer, incorporating a silky smooth 16 ball bearing system that ensures a solid lock up and zero side-to-side play,” IWI US officials maintain.

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U.S. Army scientists are trying to show how better-fitting body armor can improve a soldier’s performance.

Members of the Anthropology and Human Factors Teams at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center are conducting a range-of-motion and encumbered anthropometry study to better understand the link between fit and performance with the Improved Outer Tactical Vest Gen III.

“We have this belief that if the fit of the body armor is really good, then the performance is going to be maximized,” Dr. Hyeg joo Choi, the principal investigator for the study, said in an Oct. 9 Army press release. “So the question is how can we quantify a good fit so that soldiers’ performance is maximized?”

To help answer that question, Choi and her fellow researchers collected measurements from 23 soldiers at Natick, including 21 males and two females.

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Carl-Gustaf M4 (2)

Saab Defense unveiled the latest version of its Carl Gustaf 84mm weapon system today at AUSA 2014.

The new M4 Multipurpose Weapon System is about 30 percent lighter than the current M3 Multi-role Anti-armor Anti-tank Weapon System being used by special operators and conventional infantry in Afghanistan.

The M4 – known in the U.S. as M3A1 MAAWS, is the latest man-portable shoulder-launched recoilless rifle from Saab designed to provide users with flexible capability and help troops to remain agile in any scenario, Saab officials maintain.

The 75th Ranger Regiment and other special operations forces began using the M3 MAAWS in 1991. The U.S. Army began ordering the M3 for conventional infantry units to use in Afghanistan in 2011. The M3 weighs 22 pounds and measures 42 inches long. The breech-loading M3 can reach out and hit enemy targets up to 1,000 meters away.

The new M3A1 is significantly lighter and shorter than the M3. It weighs 15 pounds and measures 39 3/8 inches long. The weight savings comes from a titanium liner and carbon-fiber wrapping, Saab officials maintain.

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Lithium TWS 3
U.S. Army equipment officials are encouraging units to use lithium AA batteries rather than the cheaper alkaline version to power thermal weapon sights and night vision gear.

The L91 lithium battery costs more but it lasts a lot longer than the alkaline alternative, according to Project Manager Soldier Sensors and Lasers officials.

Lithium batteries provide up to three times the operating time which will allow soldiers to carry less batteries on dismounted ops, said Joe Pearson, Logistics Management Division director for PM SSL.

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fixedknife_print1Maxpedition just released a new video on the company’s new fixed-blade knife line.

Some of you may recall that Maxpedition launched the new knife line at SHOT Show in January, touching off a dispute between Maxpedition owner Tim Tang and Kevin McClung, who makes Mad Dog Knives.

Tang’s knives come in three sizes and come in a variety of blade styles. They feature hard chrome plated, D2 tool steel blades with full-tang construction.

They also look a lot like McClung’s expensive Mad Dog Knives and sheaths.

McClung argued that Tang “ripped off” his sheath designs, as well as many of “trademarked and copyrighted” design features on the knives.

Tang admits his knives are very similar to McClung’s but said he took steps to ensure they were different enough to avoid any legal problems.

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