Grunts

size0 (1)U.S. Army weapons engineers have begun fielding a new lightweight 81mm mortar that’s 14 percent lighter than current 81s.

The new M252A1 81mm mortar is 12 pounds lighter than its predecessor, the M252.

“The new lightweight system reduces the load for dismounted battalion mortar platoons, while retaining the same durability, rates of fire, and range of the legacy system,” Lt. Col. Will McDonough, Product Manager Guided Precision Munitions and Mortar Systems, known as GPM2S, said in a recent Army press release.

The Army began delivering the first 81mm M252A1 systems to units at Fort Bragg, N.C. earlier this month. The goal is to replace all current M525 systems in 2016, Army officials maintain.

The Army began fielding the lightweight M224A1 60mm mortar in 2010.

[click to continue…]

{ 10 comments }

130531-F-LX370-195

U.S. Army testers are scheduled to evaluate an experimental, air-bursting 40mm grenade next summer.

If successful, the Small Arms Grenade Munitions, or SAGM, will transition to Project Manager-Maneuver Ammunition Systems by the end of fiscal year 2015 to become an official Army program of record.

The 40mm counter-defilade round will be twice as lethal as the current 40mm grenade against targets in defilade, according to Army officials from the service’s Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center.

Grenadiers are not as effective as they could be at delivering accurate fire against enemy behind cover, Army officials maintain.

But to become an Army program of record, “we must demonstrate a certain level of functional reliability over selected target sets,” SAGM Project Officer Steven Gilbert said in a recent Army press release.

[click to continue…]

{ 22 comments }

e5cd7aa99afd953126c4ef7a4cd767a4_large

Live Fire Gear has a new version of 550 cord it calls FireCord, a versatile utility cord with flammable inner strands that serve as an emergency fire starter.

The project started out on Kickstarter and reached its funding goal earlier this year.

“FireCord is the next evolution in outdoor gear preparedness,” Live Fire Gear officials maintain.

[click to continue…]

{ 11 comments }

This official U.S Army photo shows how the service's new coyote-brown combat boots will look when worn with the new Operational Camouflage Pattern. Photo courtesy of Program Executive Office Soldier.

Next summer, soldiers will replace their desert tan combat boots with a darker, coyote-brown version. The photo above shows how the service’s new coyote-brown combat boots will look when worn with the new Operational Camouflage Pattern.

 

“To correspond with the introduction of the Operational Camouflage Pattern starting in the summer of 2015, the Army will change the color for the Army Combat Boot to a coyote brown color,” according to Thursday’s U.S. Army news release.

Army senior leaders selected the new OCP to replace the service’s ineffective Universal Camouflage Pattern after an exhaustive, four-year camouflage-improvement effort the service completed a year ago.

OCP is also known as Scorpion W2, a revised version of the original Scorpion pattern that Crye Precision LLC developed for the Army’s Future Force Warrior in 2002. Crye later made small adjustments to the pattern for better performance and trademark purposes and called it MultiCam.

The Army chose MultiCam in 2010 as its Operation Enduring Freedom Camouflage Pattern for soldiers to wear in Afghanistan. OCP and MultiCam are very similar, but there are subtle differences between the two patterns.

Soldiers deployed to Afghanistan will continue to be fielded with uniforms and equipment in OEFCP, or MultiCam, until inventories are exhausted, the release states. In the coming months the Army will also conduct operational testing and user evaluations of existing service arid and woodland patterns for possible adoption by the Army.

[click to continue…]

{ 101 comments }

modras

Italian knife maker Fox Knives Military Division has a wicked new pig sticker.

The Modras dagger features a tan-coated, 7-inch N690Co stainless steel blade with a hardness of 58-60. It has a full-tang construction with a handle made from black and tan G10.

This is not a practical knife. It’s clearly designed for infantrymen and operators who want a killing blade.

[click to continue…]

{ 24 comments }

slideshow_4

Limitless Gear has a new M4-style magazine carrier with a quick-release MOLLE attachment system that is worth checking out.

The OPFOR 30-round magazine carrier features the Rapidly Scalable Equipment Ensemble that allows you to “mount and dismount the OPFOR from 2×2 MOLLE/PALs surfaces in seconds,” Limitless Gear officials maintain.

The OPFOR also features a lidless Positive Magazine Retention system. Magazines are automatically locked in place just like in your weapons magazine well and can be quickly and easily withdrawn from the OPFOR by applying a simple twist and pull. This eliminates the need for flaps or bungee cords that prevent access to your next magazine, company officials say.

[click to continue…]

{ 9 comments }

1002640880_3AsJD-M-1

The U.S. Army is working on an improved version of the Flameless Ration Heater that doesn’t need water to heat Meals, Ready-to-Eat.

“Unlike the current ration heater, the Air Activated heater does not require water, a valuable battlefield commodity. This new approach to heating and advanced technology aims to lower cost, weight, and logistics burden of chemical heating technologies,” according to Army officials at Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center.

The Air Activated Heater contains a peel away layer that, once removed, allows air to penetrate the holes of the outer foil layer. After passing through the felt diffusion layer, the air reacts with the activated carbon, electrolyte, and rate-controlling binder, producing a safe exothermic reaction, Natick officials say.

This new technology will heat the MRE entrée by 100 degrees Fahrenheit in less than ten minutes. Negligible hydrogen off-gassing eliminates operational and transport restrictions associated with the current heater and offers improved safety, according to Natick.

The DoD Combat Feeding Program plans to transition the technical data to Defense Logistics Agency – Troop Support for use with the MRE.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }