Warfighting

Marines_flash-bang

Who doesn’t like German flash-bang grenades? Certainly not American commandos.

The U.S. subsidiary of the German arms-maker Rheinmetall AG recently landed a five-year, $17 million contract with the Navy to supply U.S. Special Operations Command with flash-bang grenades, according to a Pentagon announcement.

The name of the product wasn’t specified in the contract description, though it’s probably the MK13 Mod 0 BTV-EL Sound & Flash grenade, a high-performance stun grenade. [click to continue…]

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crye_precision_9x7x3_pouch_slide

Crye Precision LLC has unveiled a new line of modular pouches that offers a few new twists on the general purpose pouch genre.

The Smart Pouch Suite features six pouches and accessories to offer multiple options for carrying kit to satisfy mission needs, Crye officials maintain.

The SPS consists of a Frag Pouch, 5.56/7.62/MBITR Pouch, 152/Bottle Pouch, GP Pouch 6x6x3, GP Pouch 9x7x3 and GP Pouch 11x6x4.

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mandarin_collar

The U.S. Army on Wednesday released much-anticipated details about its new camouflage uniform slated to hit shelves next year. Military.com’s Matt Cox, a frequently contributor to KitUp, has followed this issue closely and reported the latest news in a separate article.

Disregarding for a moment the actual appearance of the camouflage pattern, here are some of the key design changes under consideration: [click to continue…]

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.50-cal_tracers

The U.S. Army is seeking “one-way” tracers that can only be seen from the vantage point of a shooter — a big advantage that would solve an age-old drawback with the technology by not giving away his position.

Engineers with the service’s Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, known as ARDEC, at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey are working on developing the technology, known as the One-Way Luminescence, or OWL, tracer round, according to a recent press release from the service.

What’s more, the service is holding a competition to solicit bids from companies interested in manufacturing the technology, according to the release. [click to continue…]

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Op Cam Patt frontal

At long last, the U.S. Army has released the first images of its new Operational Camouflage Pattern, the replacement for the service’s Universal Camouflage Pattern. Army Times was the first to post the new pics yesterday.

The service plans to print Army Combat Uniforms in the new pattern and make them available at at Military Clothing Sales Stores next summer.

OCP is also known as Scorpion W2, a revised version of the original Scorpion pattern that Crye Precision LLC developed for the Army’s Future Force Warrior in 2002. Crye later made small adjustments to the pattern for better performance and trademark purposes and called it MultiCam.

The new OCP is very similar to MultiCam, the pattern the Army chose in 2010 for soldiers to wear in Afghanistan. Army officials maintain however that there are differences between the two patterns.

Stay tuned for future updates.

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Multicam Afghanistan

U.S. Army officials released an official statement today on its long-waited camouflage decision, and it left a lot of questions unanswered.

The statement echoes what Gen. Dennis L. Via, the head of Army Materiel Command, said July 23 – that Scorpion W2 would likely be fielded sometime in 2015.

But the statement never names Scorpion W2 as the replacement for the current Universal Camouflage Pattern. It only refers to the pattern as the Army’s new Operational Camouflage Pattern.

Here’s the complete statement:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Army statement on the Operational Camouflage Uniform

July 31, 2014

By Senior Army Spokesperson

ARLINGTON, Va. (July 31, 2014) — The Army has selected a pattern as its
base combat uniform camouflage pattern. The Army has confirmed through
testing that the pattern would offer exceptional concealment, which directly
enhances force protection and survivability for Soldiers.

The Army is naming the pattern the Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP) to
emphasize that the pattern’s use extends beyond Afghanistan to all Combatant
Commands. The Army’s adoption of OCP will be fiscally responsible by
transitioning over time and simply replacing current uniforms and equipment
as they wear out.

The Army anticipates the Army Combat Uniform with the OCP will be available
for purchase by Soldiers at Military Clothing Sales Stores (MCSS) in the
summer of 2015.\\_______

There are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. At the top of the list is a detailed account of the testing the Army put this revised version of the original 2002 Scorpion pattern through.

Roughly a year ago, Army uniform officials completed a four-year camouflage improvement effort. The finalists were Crye Precision, ADS Inc., teamed with Hyperstealth, Inc.; Brookwood Companies Inc.; and Kryptek Inc.

The Army should explain how Scorpion W2 compares to these top-performing patterns and release the test data to the public.

 

 

 

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m9_zoom004

The U.S. Army may is trying to replace the M9 9mm pistol, but it’s still buying new Berettas.

Beretta Defense Technologies announced today that the Army will spend “a quarter million dollars worth of additional M9 pistols from Beretta U.S.A. Corp, according to a press release from the Beretta.

The Army acquired the additional pistols by issuing the 6th delivery order to date against a contract for up to 100,000 pistols awarded by the Army to Beretta U.S.A. Corp. in September 2012, the press release states.

The Pentagon adopted the M9 in 1985. It has been in U.S. production since 1987 and is manufactured at the Beretta U.S.A. facility located in Accokeek, Maryland. To date, Beretta has delivered over 600,000 M9 pistols, with 18,000 already scheduled for delivery under the new 5-year contract.

As the lead agent for small arms, the Army will hold an industry day July 29 to talk to gun makers about the joint, Modular Handgun System or MHS. [click to continue…]

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