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FORT BENNING, Ga. – It’s been about eight years since the U.S. Army first deployed its smart-soldier technology to war. Now soldiers are finally viewing this digital, situational-awareness gear as a trusted piece of soldier kit.

The Army’s Experimentation Force, made up of soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment here, recently tested the wearable, command and control gear known as Nett Warrior Future Initiative during the Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiment.

The Nett Warrior system is a Samsung Galaxy Note II smartphone worn in a chest-mounted pouch and connected to networked radio such as a Harris Falcon III AN/PRC-152A wideband networking handheld radio or the older General Dyanamics AN/PRC-154A Rifleman Radio.

Without getting too far into the weeds, Nett Warrior Future Initiative is equipped with a special software package that helps the system handle multiple intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance sensor feeds such as video streams from unmanned aerial systems.

So a platoon leader can share these video streams from a company-level Raven UAS and a platoon-level InstantEye UAS with his squad leaders.

Spec. Erin Broihier, a radio operator with A Company, said he has been impressed by how much Nett warrior has improved over the past four AEWEs.

“Every time they have brought it back, it has gotten better and better and better,” he said.

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FORT BENNING, Ga. – U.S. Army maneuver officials here just finished testing miniature drones and other high-tech, soldier kit — much of which is designed to help infantry squads and platoons spot the enemy first.

From March 2 through March 5, soldiers from the Army’s Experimentation Force, or EXFOR, here participated in the Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiment — an annual event aimed at evaluating innovative equipment with the potential to revolutionize infantry combat.

This year, the AEWE focused on 75 prototype technologies ranging from network communications gear to loadbearing kit to sustainment and force protection equipment.

Many showed promise, but it was the pocket-sized Black Hornet and backpack-sized InstantEye unmanned aerial systems that captured the imaginations of 1st Platoon, A Company, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, the unit that makes up the EXFOR. [click to continue…]

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Picatinny Phone RailTargetVision released its picatinny phone mount to allow shooters to use their smartphones to take video or use a wireless spotting scope.

The aluminum rail is 6 inches long with a protrusion length of 4.75 inches. It weighs 0.3 pounds and sells for $150.

It has an Allen wrench locking screw and a ball head that allow the shooter to film the right angle.  [click to continue…]

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Beretta USA said the U.S. Army has rejected the gun-maker’s request that the service reconsider its M9A3 pistol as an alternative to the Modular Handgun System (MHS) program.

Beretta officials sent the Jan. 30 request in response to the Army’s formal rejection of the M9A3 Engineering Change Proposal to the current M9 contract.

“Needless to say, we are disappointed,” Gabriele de Plano, vice president of Beretta Defense Technologies (BDT) Marketing Operations, said in March 2 email.

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SCHAXE9n

Schrade knives has come out with a new camp axe with a handy folding little saw built into the handle.

The Schrade Compact Axe “pairs a function, full size camp axe with a fully extending 12.5-inch folding saw tucking away inside the handle. It’s a sturdy, simple axe with a titanium coated 3Cr13 stainless steel blade measuring 3.3 inches,” according to Knifecenter.com.

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It has been widely reported that the Russian military has adopted the AK12 rifle for its elite forces, but there is very little info available about its other new rifle choice – the AK 103-4.

Deputy Minister of Defence Yuriy Borisov announced on Russian radio on 24 January that the Russian armed forces had selected the AK12, chambered in 5.45×39 mm, and the AK-103-4, chambered in 7.62x39mm, according to IHS Jane’s Defense Weekly.

Without question, the AK12 is the big news. Improved ergonomics is the key feature that sets the AK12 apart from the AK family, according to AK12-maker Kalashnikov Concern, formerly known as Izhmash.

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“The AK-12 assault carbine also has a new ergonomic fire selector control … a person can operate the mechanical controls of the assault rifle with one hand,” Kalashnikov officials maintain. “A soldier can still do everything he needs to do with the weapon: move the safety, pull back the bolt and replace the magazine even if wounded or when using his other hand.”

But the piece of this story that has been driving me crazy is the lack of information or images of the AK103-4.

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U.S. Army uniform officials will soon begin evaluating and certifying commercial boots in Coyote brown for soldiers to wear instead of current issue boots.

The Army Uniform Board has directed Program Executive Office Soldier to use the existing Army Combat Boot Uniform Quality Control Program, or UQCP, to provide commanders information about boots that meet the service’s safety, performance, and appearance requirements, according to an Army press release.

The timing of initial evaluation is aligned with Army’s transition to “Coyote 498” boots associated with the transition to the new Operational Camouflage Pattern this summer, so the list of optional boots will not include tan boot models, according to the release.

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