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The U.S. Army may is trying to replace the M9 9mm pistol, but it’s still buying new Berettas.

Beretta Defense Technologies announced today that the Army will spend “a quarter million dollars worth of additional M9 pistols from Beretta U.S.A. Corp, according to a press release from the Beretta.

The Army acquired the additional pistols by issuing the 6th delivery order to date against a contract for up to 100,000 pistols awarded by the Army to Beretta U.S.A. Corp. in September 2012, the press release states.

The Pentagon adopted the M9 in 1985. It has been in U.S. production since 1987 and is manufactured at the Beretta U.S.A. facility located in Accokeek, Maryland. To date, Beretta has delivered over 600,000 M9 pistols, with 18,000 already scheduled for delivery under the new 5-year contract.

As the lead agent for small arms, the Army will hold an industry day July 29 to talk to gun makers about the joint, Modular Handgun System or MHS. [click to continue…]

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Multicam AfghanistanThe U.S. Army has selected a new camouflage pattern, but the service doesn’t feel the need to formally announce it.

Military.com reported in May that the Army had selected the Scorpion W2 pattern — a near replica to the Multicam pattern that soldiers are wearing in Afghanistan. However, the Army has  chosen not to even issue a press release on it yet. 

The first official acknowledgement of the camouflage selection came yesterday in a hotel suite in Washington D.C. when Gen. Dennis L. Via, head of Army Materiel Command, said the service had selected the Scorpion W2 pattern at a reporter round table. It wasn’t announced at the event, Via only mentioned it after he was directly asked about it by a reporter. [click to continue…]

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Raven Concealment  Systems is marketing what looks like a handy little piece of kit for concealing bulky EDC items in your front pants pocket.

The ModuLoader Pocket Shield is a flexible platform which allows an individual to securely and discreetly carry a small defensive implement — such as a firearm, pistol magazine, fixed-blade or folding knife, flashlight, canister of pepper spray or an expandable baton —  inside the front pocket of jeans or dress pants without visible pocket clips or printing, Raven officials maintain.

“The Pocket Shield not only provides a stable platform – it masks the profile of whatever is attached to it. This is especially important for those who must wear dress pants or other garments made with thin, clingy material,” according to Raven officials.

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SilencerCo today unveiled its new suppressor designed for shotguns. The Salvo 12 provides a much needed option for shooting enthusiasts, officials from the Utah-based suppressor manufacture maintain.

“The Salvo 12 represents a revolution in silencers, not just an evolution,” said Joshua Waldron, Chief Executive Officer for SilencerCo, in a July 21 press release. “There is a huge installed base of shotgun hunters and shooters that has been waiting for a product like this for a long time, and we are proud to deliver it.”

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Mad Duo Brad 511 4-Banger 5

by Breach-Bang-Brad

Months back, I finally got my hands on a 4-Banger Bag from 5.11. I had been looking forward to checking the bag out for some time. I gave it a few spins in my hands, along with the normal poking and prodding that comes with new gear, then quickly starting loading it with essentials for a “get home” type situation. The 4-Banger stays in my wife’s van because that’s our primary family vehicle. I want her to have a solid and dependable bag capable of storing what she’d need if my family was to get stranded without me.

Mad Duo Brad 511 4-Banger 4

Mad Duo Brad 511 4-Banger 3

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The U.S. Army has been very hush-hush about its decision to replace its Universal Camouflage Pattern with Scorpion, a pattern the service has owned since 2002. But details are slipping out. My story on Military.com today talks about how the improved version — Scorpion W2– looks virtually the same as MultiCam.

Caleb Crye, the owner of Crye Precision, developed the original Scorpion pattern for the Army’s Future Force warrior program. Then he made some changes to help it perform better and trademarked it as MultiCam.

It will be interesting to see whether Crye thinks the new Scorpion W2 looks too similar to MultiCam. It would nice if the Army didn’t have to phase out the $3 billion worth of MultiCam uniforms and equipment it has purchased so far for Afghanistan.

Wouldn’t that be a waste of taxpayer money? But I’m sure Army uniform officials are too smart to let that happen.

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Army bootsSgt. Major of the Army Raymond Chandler III recently issued guidance to help clarify the Army’s position on commercial-off-the-shelf combat boots.

“There has been misunderstanding with the ALARACT Message 140/2007 with leaders in interpreting which COTS boots are authorized and which are not,” Chandler wrote in a document that was posted on Facebook’s Army NCO Support page. “My intent is to add clarity to the ALARACT message giving leaders a better understanding of which boots are authorized for wear and why.”

There are many COTS boots that meet Army guidelines, Chandler wrote.

“Some examples of these items include, but are not limited to, the Belleville Model 390, the 8-inch Danner Desert TFX, the 8-inch Oakley S.I. Assault Boot as well as many other more traditional Army tan combat boot styles. The purpose of listing these items here is to give examples of styles that fall within the guidelines and authorization as optional to wear,” Chandler wrote. [click to continue…]

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